With uses ranging from transporting troops to increasing mobility for people with disabilities, off-road vehicles (ORVs) are being used by more people now than when the all-terrain vehicle (ATV) emerged in the 1960s. With increased demand comes increased discussion about how ORVs are regulated. And the answer is, it depends on where you live.
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Last month, Wired reported that researchers hacked the dashboard entertainment system of a vehicle being driven on public streets. Once they had access, they used that entry point to remotely control vehicle systems through the onboard diagnostics port. The researchers warned that they could have easily hacked hundreds of thousands of vulnerable vehicles traveling the world’s highways.

After this demonstration, digital security researchers at the University of California at San Diego went a step further. They showed that they could take control of a vehicle’s onboard diagnostics port to activate the wipers, engage the brakes and even disable the brakes at low speed. That feat — remotely disabling brakes — causes significant safety concerns.
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The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (“NHTSA”) issued a final rule requiring vehicle manufacturers to install rear view cameras in all vehicles by May 1, 2018.  Will this new rule lead to new avenues of litigation risk and potential liability for vehicle manufacturers?  If past history is a guide, the answer may well be yes.

This new rule, announced on April 7, 2014, applies to all vehicles under 10,000 pounds gross vehicle weight, excluding motorcycles and trailers.   NHTSA established a 48-month phase-in period for manufacturers to equip vehicles with rear view cameras.  The phase-in period runs from May 1, 2016 to May 1, 2018.  The rear view cameras must have a 10-foot by 20-foot field of view directly behind the vehicle.  Small volume and multi-stage vehicle manufacturers are excluded from the phase-in but must comply with all requirements by May 1, 2018.
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